Bird Deterrent

You can spend hundreds of dollars on pretty bird feeders and the gourmet mix of wild birdseed, but there are sometimes areas of the yard where those same birds can be a nuisance. That’s the time to figure out a good bird deterrent.

Gardeners know that even the prettiest birds can be a detriment to the garden. If you have a cherry tree just ripening or rows of corn to harvest for the family barbecue, you know how useful a good bird deterrent might be.

Bird deterrent options abound to rid the garden of nuisance birds

There are several options for bird deterrents. Consider the old-fashioned, classic scarecrow. This option affords you a fun decorative element for your garden even if it doesn’t work, but some people report some success using this method to shoo birds away.

You could try replicating a natural enemy to trick the birds out of your garden. This bird deterrent method involves placing an inflatable or plastic snake or owl in the garden to fool the birds into thinking the area has already been claimed. Some birds might fall for this and some … well, might not.

How about scaring the nuisance birds away with noise? You could tap on an aluminum pan to scare the skittish birds away or employ the use of wind chimes for this noisy bird deterrent. You might even play a tape of noises made by bird predators.

To keep away the most determined birds, like blue jays and crows, you might want to consider buying a bird deterrent product, like that offered by www.birdbgone.com, where you can buy a shock system, sound deterrents, or bird netting, a popular option for home gardeners.

There are many harmless bird deterrent products available, such as ultrasonic bird repellers that scare birds off with an ultrasonic sound not heard by humans. But it will likely condition those birds to stay away from your garden.

You might also try a sonic bird repeller, which is available, along with the ultrasonic bird repeller above, from Johnson & Associates Products in Corvalis, Ore. This bird deterrent product creates intermittent distress calls and predator cries that scare birds away.